Avast Antivirus accused of selling user data to Google

Avast Antivirus accused of selling 100 million user data to Google


An investigation into Avast is being carried out to sell user data to Google, Microsoft and Home Depot.

Avast Antivirus is one of the largest free antivirus programs that you can download on the Internet, and an investigation into the company for the sale of user data is now underway.

According to Dark Reading, the Czech Personal Data Protection Office is now investigating the actions of the Prague-based antivirus software company, Avast. The investigation is to determine if Avast has been selling personal information from its user base to companies such as Google, Microsoft and Home Depot.

The data that is suspected of being sold to these companies is the user's browser history, online map searches, YouTube viewing habits and more. In January, Motherboard and PCMag found evidence that Avast collected data and sold it through its subsidiary company called "Jumpshot". Since this was discovered, Avast closed its Jumpshot division.

avast antivirus

The antivirus system employed by hundreds of millions of people in the world is selling extremely sensitive web shopping information to some of the world's biggest corporations, a common research by Motherboard and PCMag has found. Our study relies on leaked individual information, contracts, And other organization documents that appear the sale of the information is both extremely sensitive and is in some cases thought to be private between the company selling the information and the clients purchasing it. These documents, from the company of the antivirus giant Avast named Jumpshot, shine current light on the secretive selling and supply chain of peoples' net shopping histories. They reveal that the Avast antivirus system installed on the person's machine gathers information, and that Jumpshot repackages it into several other products that are so sold to some of the largest companies in the world.

Documents reveal that the antivirus corporation Avast has been selling its users' net shopping information, through the company named Jumpshot, to customers that include Pepsi, Google, and Microsoft, reports Motherboard. This study is the result of the common research between the VICE News website and PC magazine. These documents, from the company of the antivirus giant Avast named Jumpshot, shine current light on the secretive selling and supply chain of peoples' net shopping histories. They reveal that the Avast antivirus system installed on the person's machine gathers information, and that Jumpshot repackages it into several other products that are so sold to some of the largest companies in the world. Some past, existing, and prospective customers consider Google, Yelp, Microsoft, McKinsey, cola, , Home Depot, Condé Nast, Intuit, and Some others. Some customers paid billions of dollars for products that include the so-called `` All clicks Feed, '' which will cover individual behaviour, clicks, and move across sites at extremely precise detail.

That is why I believe you should consider using avast’s available antivirus product. As the collaborative study from Motherboard and PCMag newly discovered, the Avast company, Jumpshot, scoops up information from Avast antivirus users and sells it to advertisers, Who will then mix it with other information they take on the activities to follow you in great detail. Agreeing to motherboard’s piece

At Jan of 2020, data surfaced that Avast Antivirus may have traded 1000s of profiles on users of this Avast Antivirus structure. Though the company claimed all information was `` de-identified s", some information sources established companies would effectively analyze any information to purchases customers created though their personal logs and so exchange directly to them. Whether Avast meant for the data they allowed to be traceable is ambiguous yet.



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